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  1. #1
    j7wild Guest

    Question Anyone use Ubuntu (Linux) OS?

    I am thinking of dumping Microsoft!!

    Anyone tried Ubuntu?

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ubuntu_(Linux_distribution)

    Does it work to surf the internet and play Windows games and view downloaded videos?



  2. #2
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    OOOooo, Pick me, pick me, pick me!!!!!

    Yes, I am a proud user of Ubuntu (or, more specifically, Kubuntu, which is basically the same thing but uses the KDE desktop manager instead of the GNOME desktop manager), and have been for many months, so much so that I set a New Year's Resolution to remove Microsoft Windows completely from our home computer (which may or may not happen, but I can try).

    Does it work to surf the Internet? I am using it right now. Specifically, I'm on Firefox. Quite frankly, I don't see a difference between Firefox on Ubuntu and Firefox on Windows. The default email application for Ubuntu is Evolution, a rather nice Outlook replacement that only works on Linux, but I prefer Thunderbird, mainly because I like using programs that work on both Windows and Linux, so when I have to use Windows (like at work), I have my familiar programs.

    Can you view downloaded videos? Yes, but this is a bit trickier in some ways. Ubuntu, by default, only includes "open" codecs, drivers, and programs. Some codecs, even some that are "free", aren't really "open", so you have to work a little to get them. That includes MP3 and DVD. Fortunately, it isn't hard to install. I must say that Adobe releasing Flash 9 for Linux has helped considerably with watching online flash videos. Flash 8 was never released for Linux, and Flash 7 on Linux had audio/video synch problems with flash movies (often the video would be 2-3 seconds ahead of the audio, which was annoying). But 9 works wonderfully.

    Does it play Windows games? Simple answer... no. For the most part, Windows software will not run on Linux, and this includes games. In fact, many hard-core Linux users keep Windows on their computer specifically and only for games and tax software (the two big things missing in Linux).

    Now, that is the simple answer. There are more complex answers. A program called WINE (Wine Is Not an Emulator) will allow several Windows programs to install and run on Linux, but it takes some work getting it configured properly (or so I have heard... I haven't tried it to be honest). WINE is free. There is another program, called CrossOver, that does the same thing, only it does a much better job and is easier to use. CrossOver is not free, however, and I haven't used it, either. For more information, you might want to start with "The easy, Wine way to run Windows apps on Linux".

    There are several games available on Linux, but for the most part, Linux is not a gaming machine. Of course, that depends on what you are referring to as "games". If you are thinking of Solitaire, MineSweeper and Tetris, then you are in luck. Linux has more of those types of games than you know what to do with.

    I don't play too many games anymore (not because of Linux, just because I don't), but I like to fiddle around with SuperTux (similar to the original SuperMario Bros.), LinCity (similar to SimCity), and Wormux (similar to the Worms series). I also play a few games of Mahjong and Sudoku.

    As for more advanced games, I saw a recent review for Nexuiz, an online FPS, which looked interesting (I haven't tried it). Other games I have heard good things about, but I haven't tried, include Flightgear, a flight simulator game, FreeCiv, similar to Civilization, and Vega Strike, a space combat game.

    I'm not saying that there aren't others that aren't good, or that those are the only ones I have heard of, they are just the ones that I can think of off the top of my head (with a quick search for the URLs).

    But one of the nice things about Ubuntu is the install disk is what is referred to as a "LiveCD". That means you can boot off the CD and run Linux completely off the CD without installing it first. That gives you a good feel for how well it will operate on your computer, although it will be a bit slow since a CD drive is much slower than a harddrive. The Ubuntu CD has a nice selection of programs on it (Firefox browser, OpenOffice.org office suite, GIMP photo editor, Gaim IM client, Evolution email program, and others), but as I pointed out, I'm not that impressed with the actual desktop manager (there isn't anything particularly wrong with it, it just reminds me of Mac OS 8). Kubuntu, in my opinion, has a better desktop (reminds me more of Windows, but there are still differences), but the default applications aren't quite as good (Konquerer web browser, Krita photo editor, Kopete IM client, although it also has OpenOffice.org).

    Of course, once (if?) you install it on your computer, you can add whatever programs you want, but the CDs are limited by space.

    And there is also Xubuntu, which uses the Xfce desktop manager, but that is mainly for older computers. I have never used Xfce. Edubuntu is also available, but it is a tad different. Like Ubuntu, it uses the Gnome desktop manager, but it has more "edutainment" programs and more parental control programs and is designed more for education/student/youth use.

    I could go on and on and on, but that should get you started. Of course, if you have any questions, you know where to find me, and I will do my best to answer them (although don't mistake me for a Linux expert... in many ways, I am still a Linux newb, but an enthusiastic advanced newb).

    A co-worker asked me the other day why I used Linux at home (especially since I am the IT department at my office, and we are nearly entirely Windows with a couple of Macs). I told them, "I deal with Windows problems every day at work, sometimes one or two, sometimes a ton of them, sometimes really simple, sometimes extremely complex. When I go home, I want to use a computer that just works."

    And if anyone out there says I should go with a Mac, I just want to point out that Mac OSX is built on top of Unix, which Linux is patterned after. So there are more similarities between the two than most people think.
    Last edited by corfy; 03-06-2007 at 10:26 PM. Reason: Tweaked various sentence structures and missing info
    Corfy
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  3. #3
    j7wild Guest

    Cool

    Wow!!

    Thanks Corfy!!



    That's a lot of INFO!!

    (I was expecting a short answer or no answer at all since we are all so dependent on Windows).

    I will look into all those programs you mentioned and do more research online about Linux and Linux related software.

    I have no desire to use Vista and I am tired of constantly updating XP!!


  4. #4
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    Not a problem. Normally, I have to tie people down when I talk about Linux, or at the very least I watch their eyes glaze over, so I jump at the chance to answer any questions I can about it.

    I will say that you will have to update Ubuntu as well, and more often than Windows (since Windows updates are only supposed to be released on the second Tuesday of the month), but there are some differences. For one, the updates for Windows XP are just that, updates for Windows XP (and maybe MS Office). Other programs in Windows don't get updated unless you update them (or unless they have an update feature built in, like Firefox does). Updates in Ubuntu are for everything you have installed through Ubuntu's software manager. Plus, unlike XP, you rarely have to restart the computer after updating.

    One thing that might help the transition is to start using some of the Linux software on Windows. Not everything is available, but there are several that are.

    For example:

    Firefox instead of Internet Explorer (although I think you already do this)
    Thunderbird instead of Outlook Express
    OpenOffice.org instead of Microsoft Office
    GIMP instead of Photoshop
    Gaim instead of Yahoo IM, AIM, and/or MSN Messenger
    VLC Player or MPlayer instead of Quicktime or Windows Media Player

    This is not, by any means, a complete list. If you have another program you want to find a replacement for, let me know and I will see what I can find for you.

    That was one of the things that convinced me to try Linux about two years ago... I was using all of this free Windows software that had Linux versions available, so what did I need Windows for? That, and the fact that I spent the better part of a week cleaning viruses off a co-workers home computer. After that, I figured that there had to be a better way than Windows.

    I first tried Debian, which I don't recommend (it was too hard to install, although it was fine once it was running). It was a slow transition at first, but I started using Linux more and more. I switched from Debian to Ubuntu a little over a year ago (Ubuntu is based on Debian, but Ubuntu is a lot better), and have absolutely loved it. I have used it nearly exclusively (instead of Windows) since July or so, although I did try Fedora briefly, but I didn't like it as well. And in October, I attended the Ohio Linux Festival, which proved to me that I wasn't as alone using Linux as I sometimes feel. (Here is a picture taken from last year... I'm the guy in the red shirt in the lower right corner.)

    The last time I had to reinstall Windows on a work computer, it took me the better part of four hours to re-install Windows, all of the updates, Microsoft Office, and the various other basic programs. The last time I installed Ubuntu, the basic install off the CD took about 30 minutes, and that included OpenOffice.org, Firefox, GIMP, Gaim, and Evolution all ready to go (and since it is a LiveCD, I could surf the web or play some desktop games while Ubuntu was installing). Updates took a bit longer, but since I didn't have to restart the computer, it didn't seem to be quite as much of an issue. Of course, adding in my own programs took additional time, but I already had a fully working computer (just not customized to my tastes).

    BTW, the next update for Ubuntu is due to be released next month (April 19). Ubuntu normally supports their releases for 18 months for desktops. (They release a new version every six months... their version number is a combination of the year it was released and the month, so next month's version will be 7.04 for April, 2007... just don't ask me where they get the animal names from... Breezy Badger, Dapper Drake, Edgy Eft, Fiesty Fawn, etc.) Last year, they released a "long term support" (LTS) version, which they will support for 3 years on desktops, but since there is only about 2 years left on that and a year and half on the next release, I'm not sure there is much of a difference from the support standpoint. I'm not sure when the next "LTS" release will be. I keep myself up-to-date with the latest version, although I wait a week or two after the new version is released before I upgrade because the download servers are so overwhelmed. I'm on my third version now (5.10 to 6.06 LTS to 6.10), and it has gotten better and better with each release.

  5. #5
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    Great discussion.
    I've been thinking about switching to a form of linux as well.

    Corfy.. how are you currently running both Ubuntu and Windows? Is your hard-drive partitioned, or can you run both together?

  6. #6
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    Im more curious if its possible to have data on disk once and use them in both systems...
    Me angry! Wheres my food!

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  7. #7
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    Anyhoo I dont really encounter problems on my XP (knocking on teeth), I never experienced *need to restart* or some blocking (only sometimes something falls down....
    Im more curious if switching system would help me increase speed and such, since it still feels like my PC is really SLOWING down....

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    I felt so inspired by Corfy's post that I just got rid of Microsoft Office and I'm now proud user of OpenOffice. Thank You Corfy.

    In my case it's impossible to crossover to other platform. I use programs that require Windows But if I could I would do it right away.

  9. #9
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    Oh, wow, a bunch of questions for me. I'm going to start feeling spoiled.

    Unfortunately, being at work, I don't have time to spend answering them all in detail (of course, you saw what my "in detail" posts looked like in my first two posts). But I can give "quick" answers and expand on them later if you want.

    JP - I have two setups on three computers, all dual-boot. My desktop computer has a second harddrive, with Linux on it's own harddrive (and since I then recently upgraded my Windows harddrive, I had a spare sitting around to play with). For my first foray into Linux, that seemed to be the safest and easiest way to go. Since laptops typically don't have a second harddrive, my wife's laptop and my work laptop are both partitioned.

    JP and St39.6 - (JP really didn't ask, but I think it was sorta implied.) Windows XP typically uses the NTFS file system, which Linux doesn't really like (Windows owns the specifications for that file system, which are very complex, and don't let just anyone see how it works). Ubuntu treats NTFS as read-only, so you can read the information, you just can't change anything. Older XPs may use the FAT32 file system, which Linux can read just fine. But Windows can't read Linux partitions (or should say, won't read, since that information is freely available for anyone, even Microsoft, to use). So I have Windows on NTFS, Linux on ext3 (I think), and I created an extra partition on my laptop (and I have several partitions on my desktop) as FAT32, which both Windows and Linux can read... kinda of a DMZ on my computer. For the laptops, on a 40 GB harddrive, I have a 20 GB Windows partition, a 10 GB Linux partition, and the rest as a FAT32 partition.

    I just read that it looks like the next version of Ubuntu next month might have better drivers for NTFS, so that limitation may change.

    St3.9 - It is my experience that Linux runs faster than Windows on the same system mainly because there is less bloat in Linux (smaller programs usually mean faster performance). Linux also has less system requirements (The latest version of Ubuntu recommends a 500 MHz processor, 256 MB of memory, and 10 GB harddrive... Windows Vista recommends 2 GHz processor, 1 GB memory, 40 GB harddrive and a DirectX9 video card.) But Linux does not experience the same slow-down problems that Windows has (I don't have time to go into the disaster that is the Windows Registry right now). You also don't have to worry about defragging your harddrive, and it isn't as critical to run anti-virus... some say you don't have to run AV at all, but after years of working with Windows, I just don't feel comfortable without AV. There are some viruses for Linux, but they are rare and they don't work that well (there are dozens of Linux virus compared to tens of thousands of Windows viruses).

    A rather long "short answer", but I didn't want to leave important stuff out even if I don't go into as much detail as I can or would like, although probably going into more detail than I should.

  10. #10
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    Back in December, someone asked me "If Linux is so great, why don't more people use it?". I wrote up a rather long response (surprise, surprise) and emailed it to him. I thought you might be interested in it:

    Why Linux isn't used by more people

    First off, people who argue that "Microsoft is everywhere and must be a good software company otherwise it wouldn't be everywhere" seem to conveniently overlook the fact that Microsoft is a convicted Monopoly in the United States and the European Union (and possibly others, but those are the ones I can think of off the top of my head).

    I read a quote once (I don't remember who said it, and I don't remember the exact wording) that said something to the effect of "There is nothing wrong with becoming a monopoly, it is trying to keep that monopoly when the problems start." My problem with Microsoft isn't so much that they have grown into a Monopoly (which could go back to the better products idea), but that they have done everything in their considerable power to keep that monopoly alive, justified or not.

    Examples are everywhere. After jumping onto the Internet bandwagon a tad late, it decided, rather than compete head-to-head with Netscape (which typically charged people for the browser), Microsoft swayed the playing field by bundling Internet Explorer with Windows. (This is after buying the software from Spyglass with the promise of giving them a high percentage of the profits from sales, and then turning around and giving the program away for free.)

    Then there is Java, designed to be cross-platform, which Microsoft at first bundled with Windows but tried to make "improvements" to so that programs written for their Java would only work on Windows. A court ruled that Microsoft couldn't do that, so Microsoft responded by not providing Java at all (of course, Java is still available for Windows through Sun).

    If you want more examples, I will be happy to provide them for you.

    Then there is file formats. The Microsoft Office file format standards are not released by Microsoft unless you pay Microsoft for them. Other companies have gotten pretty good at reverse engineering the Microsoft file format, which is why every version of Microsoft Office introduces changes to the Microsoft Office file formats (you were commenting about opening Microsoft files in other programs... I run into problems swapping files back and forth between Microsoft Office 97, 2000, XP and 2003, so the problems I see with OpenOffice.org opening a Microsoft file is minimal compared to problems of opening a Microsoft Word 2003 file in Microsoft Word 97). But as long as Microsoft can keep people using Microsoft Office file formats, then they have a large corner of the market.

    Last year (well, almost 2 years ago now), the OASIS international business standards board announced the creation of the OpenDocument Format (ODF), an office file format that is open for anyone to use for the free exchanging of files. The idea being that the standard is free to use by any software program, and that files created in the ODF format can be opened and edited by every software program that supports it, so it won't matter what software operating system the file was created on or what program was used, if the program that creates the file can save as OpenDocument Format, and the program that opens it can open OpenDocument format, then the file can be transferred successfully. They have file formats for word processing, spreadsheets, databases, and other types of files.

    Shortly after that announcement, Microsoft announced it was creating it's own OpenXML format. Although the two file formats are similar (both are compressed XML files), they are not compatible, and many people question whether Microsoft's OpenXML is truly open, and others question why Microsoft just doesn't use ODF instead. In the meantime, ODF has gotten approval not only by OASIS, but also by ISO (the International Organization for Standardization).

    Currently, programs that use ODF (either to open or save or both) include OpenOffice.org, StarOffice, IBM Workplace, NeoOffice, AbiWord, KWord, Google Docs, phpMyAdmin, Scribus, KSpread, and many others (mostly smaller programs). In addition, Corel has stated that their next Office suite will support ODF.

    The last I heard, the only programs that open or save OpenXML are Microsoft Office 2007 programs, and that isn't available to the general public yet. Corel has also stated that their next Office suite will also support OpenXML.

    There are more than just Microsoft Office file formats, though. HTML, CSS, XML, and various other web-based technologies are all standards controlled by the World Wide Web Consortium. Microsoft decided to add it's own proprietary programming techniques to the web to ensure that only Internet Explorer will be able to open (or open properly) some pages, and further ignoring the existing web standards, forcing web programmers to often double-program everything, one for IE and one for everyone else. And when someone gets lazy and only programs it for IE because that is what 80% of the world uses, then when someone comes across that page with another browser and it doesn't work/look right, the other browser is blamed when the fault really lies with Microsoft. And I'm not even going into the fiasco that is ActiveX.

    And then there is the fact that Microsoft offers discounts to computer manufacturer's for advertising Microsoft Windows. These discounts have gotten a little fairer since 2002 when this issue came up in court, but it still encourages computer manufacturers to sell as few non-Windows computers as possible. And even those few large companies that do sell Linux computers (like Dell and HP) make their Linux selection hard to find. It may be cheaper for the customer to buy a Linux computer, but the computer companies don't make as much profit that way.

    Then, of course, there is marketing. Microsoft has an extremely large marketing budget, free software typically doesn't.

    An example, let's do some pricing (ignoring small business server, bulk discounts and OEM discounts). If you had to go out and buy full (i.e., non-upgrade) software, Microsoft Windows XP Professional costs $300, and Microsoft Office 2003 Professional costs $500. So that is $800 per computer, multiplied by however many computers, but for our sake, let's say 20, so that is $16,000. Then, I think Microsoft 2003 Server is another $700, and Microsoft Exchange 2003 is another $3,700. Now, we need licenses. According to my last figures, licenses for the server are $27 each, and licenses for Exchange are $61 each. That is an additional $88 per computer, or $1,760. So that is $22,160 for just software to set up 20 computers and one server.

    Oh, no wait. I'm sorry. Please forgive me.

    I forgot about Microsoft SQL server. How silly of me. A Standard edition of Microsoft SQL Server is $900, and licenses cost $162 each. So that is an additional $4,140 for these 20 desktops and one server, bringing the total for just software up to $26,300, or $1,252 per computer.

    Now, how much of that $26,400 goes toward paying programmers, how much of that goes to pay lawyers defending anti-trust and patent-infringement lawsuits, how much of that goes to paying the Microsoft Administration staff (what does Steve Ballmer really do?), and how much of that goes to pay for marketing and advertisements?

    Now, it is my (limited) experience that a lot of that same functionality can be done using two CDs from Ubuntu (one for the server, one for the desktops), which can be freely downloaded off the Internet and burned onto two CD-Rs costing about $0.10 each for a grand total of $0.20. Or, let's say we wanted one CD for each desktop. That pushes our price up to $2.10. You can add another buck if you want to cover the cost of labels and CD envelopes.

    So that is software for 20 desktops and one server for less than a cup of coffee at Starbucks, compared to software for 20 desktops and one server for the price of a new pickup truck. And this is just software. The actual hardware is extra.

    At least a portion of the $26,000 goes to pay for flashy, scare-tactic commercials on radio and television, while none of the $2.10 gets back to Ubuntu to pay for anything more than word-of-mouth advertising.

    You ask why Linux isn't more popular? Most people I have talked to have never even heard of Linux, and most of the people who have heard of it only know the name but don't know what it is beyond that. But everyone knows Microsoft. They may not be particularly happy with it, but they stick with it because that is all they know, or they believe that Microsoft is better than everyone else because everyone uses it, or they don't like change, or they believe Microsoft's FUD (fear, uncertainty, doubt), or they are stuck with Microsoft because they can't convert their information due to it being saved only in proprietary formats that nothing else supports.

    Now, I realize that we can probably drop the price of the Microsoft products through some bulk-pricing and/or OEM pricing or by picking up SmallBusiness Server. Of course, you can drop the cost of the Ubuntu desktop CDs by ordering them through Ubuntu, since they will ship the CDs free of charge (they don't even charge shipping). Or if you don't like Ubuntu, then there is always Fedora or openSUSE or various other alternatives.

    But a large number of the alternatives are free, which means goes back to having very little advertising budget, whereas Microsoft advertising money is thrown around all over the place.

    Anyway, that goes a small way toward explaining why I think a) why more people use Microsoft and b) why more people shouldn't use Microsoft.

  11. #11
    j7wild Guest

    Question

    okay, I have 4 Internal HD on my PC and they are all 70% full; will I still be able to install and partition Linux?


  12. #12
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    You didn't say how big your harddrives are, or how much actual free space you have. Percentages don't tell me a whole lot, but I can give some examples.

    70% of 1 GB is 700 MB, leaving 300 MB (Too small for Ubuntu, although some other forms of Linux will fit)
    70% of 10 GB is 7 GB, leaving 3 GB (Big enough for Ubuntu, but only just barely)
    70% of 100 GB is 70 GB, leaving 30 GB (more than enough room)

    Although they say they say Ubuntu can be installed on a 3 GB harddrive, I wouldn't recommend it unless absolutely necessary. That doesn't leave a whole lot of room. Personally, I wouldn't advise putting Ubuntu on a partition much smaller than 10 GB. So if you have a harddrive with at least 10 GB free, then yes, you should be able to install it without any problems. That would work out to about 30% free on a 35 GB harddrive, or, like my laptop, 25% free space on a 40 GB harddrive.

    Before you partition your harddrive, I suggest:
    1 - Backing up your data on that drive if at all possible (just in case, although I haven't run into any problems other than me being stupid, but it is better to be safe than sorry)
    2 - Run defrag on that drive multiple times (2 times minimum, unless you have a better utility than XP's built in defrag). You want to try to move all of the files to the "front" of the drive, and then partition off (think, "cut off") the back. Any information left in that back part will be lost. But moving the data to the front of the drive is of secondary importance to Windows Defrag, which is why it takes multiple passes.
    3 - Make sure you have the right harddrive. I made this mistake once and deleted the wrong partition and accidently wiped out all of my Windows programs (oops... this is what I was referring to about being stupid). With four harddrives, you will have the choice in Linux of hda (Hard Drive A), hdb, hdc, and hdd, with no direct relation to the drive letters in Windows. Partitions on the drives are numbered. Chances are, your C drive in Windows will be hda1.

  13. #13
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    I used to subscribe to a magazine called Tux Magazine that was touted as being a magazine for Linux beginners. It was a free subscription, and was sent out as a PDF. Unfortunately, the magazine has stopped production, but there are a lot of good information in the magazine that people considering Linux might be interested in. Most issues are about 50 pages long and are a fairly quick read. But if people on ML are really interested in Linux, this is a good resource. I threw them on my website so you can download them.

    All 20 Issues: http://www.corfyscorner.com/other/TuxMagazine.zip (80 MB)

    Tux Issue 1 - March 2005 http://www.corfyscorner.com/other/Tu..._March2005.pdf (14 MB)
    Highlights Include:
    Save your audio files, save space
    Synch your Palm Handheld
    Manage your photo album
    Clear Desktop Clutter
    Customizing your work environment
    Touring GIMP (photo editor)

    Tux Issue 2 - May 2005 http://www.corfyscorner.com/other/Tu...02_May2005.pdf (2 MB)
    Highlights Include:
    Playing movies
    Screensavers
    The start of the Mango Parfait column (she is a hoot)
    OpenOffice.org productivity
    Creating desktop links
    GIMP tips

    Tux Issue 3 - June 2005 http://www.corfyscorner.com/other/Tu...3_June2005.pdf (4 MB)
    Highlights Include:
    CD and DVD burner
    How to use Tux Paint
    How to use iPod with Linux
    More GIMP tips
    Using Quasar Accounting

    Tux Issue 4 - July 2005 http://www.corfyscorner.com/other/Tu...4_July2005.pdf (5 MB)
    Highlights Include:
    Excel with OpenOffice.org Calc
    Secure the Linux Desktop
    "Post-it Notes" done right
    Scrapbooks and Albums

    Tux Issue 5 - August 2005 http://www.corfyscorner.com/other/Tu...August2005.pdf (4 MB)
    Highlights Include:
    Sharing Windows with Linux
    More OpenOffice.org Calc tricks
    Intro to Guarddog Firewall
    Even more GIMP tricks

    Tux Issue 6 - September 2005 http://www.corfyscorner.com/other/Tu...tember2005.pdf (7 MB)
    Highlights Include:
    Reader's Choice Awards
    Inkscape graphics designer
    Add power to Thunderbird
    Edit sound files with Audacity
    Lightweight desktop managers

    Tux Issue 7 - October 2005 http://www.corfyscorner.com/other/Tu...ctober2005.pdf (3 MB)
    Highlights Include:
    Play Windows games on Linux
    GnuCash for your finances
    More Inkscape
    Set up an iRiver on Linux

    Tux Issue 8 - November 2005 http://www.corfyscorner.com/other/Tu...vember2005.pdf (3 MB)
    Highlights Include:
    Wireless networking
    Boot multiple distributions
    Evolution and Nvu reviews
    Xfce explored

    Tux Issue 9 - December 2005 http://www.corfyscorner.com/other/Tu...cember2005.pdf (2 MB)
    Highlights Include:
    Christmas issue
    Customize actions to pop-up menus
    Customize KDE desktop manager

    Tux Issue 10 - February 2006 http://www.corfyscorner.com/other/Tu...10_Feb2006.pdf (6 MB)
    Highlights Include:
    New functionality with OpenOffice.org 2.0
    Drum machine on Linux
    Kopete Instant Messaging
    Neverball game review

    Tux Issue 11 - March 2006 http://www.corfyscorner.com/other/Tu..._March2006.pdf (4 MB)
    Highlights Include:
    Tailoring your desktop
    Add extensions and themes to Firefox
    Artwork for your desktop

    Tux Issue 12 - April 2006 http://www.corfyscorner.com/other/Tu..._April2006.pdf (2 MB)
    Highlights Include:
    Distribution smackdown (Debian, Linspire, SUSE, Fedora, Ubuntu/Kubuntu, MEPIS, Mandriva reviews)
    What to look for when choosing a Linux distribution
    Battle for Wesnoth game reviewed

    Tux Issue 13 - May 2006 http://www.corfyscorner.com/other/Tu...13_May2006.pdf (5 MB)
    Highlights Include:
    Managing Finances
    Scribus desktop publishing
    Firestarter firewall
    Photo management with F-Spot
    Project Planning software
    Use WengoPhone or Skype to make phonecalls

    Tux Issue 14 - June 2006 http://www.corfyscorner.com/other/Tu...4_June2006.pdf (3 MB)
    Highlights Include:
    Create a Vacation webpage
    CD ripping
    Learning foreign languages
    File management
    RSS readers
    OpenTTD game review (similar to Transport Tycoon)

    Tux Issue 15 - July 2006 http://www.corfyscorner.com/other/Tu...5_July2006.pdf (3 MB)
    Highlights Include:
    Connecting Evolution to Exchange
    Building a database
    Kontact PIM
    What is IRC?

    Tux Issue 16 - August 2006 http://www.corfyscorner.com/other/Tu...August2006.pdf (3 MB)
    Highlights Include:
    Manage music collections with Amarok
    Watch TV with kdetv
    Edit video with Kino
    KPlayer media player
    Picassa, Google Earth on Linux

    Tux Issue 17 - September 2006 http://www.corfyscorner.com/other/Tu...tember2006.pdf (6 MB)
    Highlights Include:
    Run Windows games/software on Linux
    Classic Linux Games
    Puzzles
    Children's learning software

    Tux Issue 18 - October 2006 http://www.corfyscorner.com/other/Tu...ctober2006.pdf (5 MB)
    Highlights Include:
    Become an Email power user
    Download and burn an ISO image
    Keep up with the weather with SuperKaramba
    Opera 9 on Linux

    Tux Issue 19 - November 2006 http://www.corfyscorner.com/other/Tu...vember2006.pdf (3 MB)
    Highlights Include:
    Create multi-layered sound recordings
    Install software the easy way
    Managing finances
    Gift guide
    Project management
    Build a home file server

    Tux Issue 20 - December 2006 http://www.corfyscorner.com/other/Tu...cember2006.pdf (5 MB)
    Highlights Include:
    Get in the Holiday mood
    OpenOffice.org Basic
    Install Linux on a second harddrive
    Linux Edutainment
    Working with groups
    Understanding Linux commands
    Planeshift game

    NOTE: The highlights are a combination of stuff found on the cover and stuff I saw flipping through the issues. They are no means a comprehensive list of what is in the issues. Sizes are approximate.
    Last edited by corfy; 03-07-2007 at 08:38 PM. Reason: Fixed Issue 10 Link

  14. #14
    Join Date
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    Lightbulb Tux Magazine

    Thanks a lot corfy!

    Edit: corfy, issue number 10: "File not found on the server" (FDM message)

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
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    Quote Originally Posted by jmcc View Post
    Thanks a lot corfy!

    Edit: corfy, issue number 10: "File not found on the server" (FDM message)
    Oh, sorry about that... the file was titled "Feb" instead of "February". That has been fixed.

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